Dating bermudian men

At a site previously 'tenanted' by William Havelock. The University of Newcastle's 'Sine' project offers a print of the 'Laing' yard at Deptford in the period of 1825 to 1835. The vacated 'Bridge Dock' was later, it would seem, occupied by Mr. In the 1881 Census, I read that James was living at Thornhill Hall, Bishopwearmouth, with his wife, four sons, five daughters, & fourteen servants (14 more than I have! It depicted thousands of men (&some women) outside the Police Station & Magistrates Court in Sunderland, in an image which included an Empire Cinema poster with the date of Feb. The vendor indicated that it possibly related to a strike or protest meeting against unemployment as there was a depression in shipbuilding at that time. 12, 1908, Sunderland Town Councilcut off the electricity supplyto the shipbuilding yard of Sir James Laing as it owed them over 2,000. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Gayner, of Sunderland, who I now see still owned the vessel in 1908/09 per Lloyd's Register ('LR'). 1910, the vessel was dismasted off La Plata, Argentina, & was towed in that condition into Pernambuco, now Recife, Brazil, ii) that in Mar. Kirsten), of Hamburg, since the vessel was sold by them, in 1898, to 'Deutsche Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft Kosmos' (DDG Kosmos), also of Hamburg. The nearest island was 2 miles distant & at dawn a scouting party went to the island & sought help from 4 Maldivians gathering coconuts. It also was engaged, however, in other areas, including the carriage of cotton & grain from New Orleans, likely to Manchester.

The increasing number of listings re Laing built vessels has already required a 2nd page - available here. Traded between Yokohama, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Honolulu & San Francisco - carrying cotton to Japan & bringing back oriental fabrics. An important vessel, I read, in the history of immigration from Asia to the U. Can you clarify the matter and/or help with more data? The letter was published next to the story about what happened to the men of the Belgium Prince.

It would seem that the Laing shipbuilding story in Sunderland commences with two brothers. Philip (image at left) is of particular interest, (wife Sophia Lundy Laing). A cargo ship, but it would seem it carried passengers so it probably was a passenger/cargo vessel. Per 1 (Rorqual), 2 (Algeria, 20% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Caucasian Steam Shipping Company, Limited, ('Caucasian') of London, 'Lane & Macandrew', which became 'Lane & Mac Andrew Ltd.', the managers. The vessel was later owned by Petroleum Steamship Co. It read in part; "We will comport ourselves as Christians toward our enemies and conduct the war in the future as in the past with humility and chivalry."Wilhelm Werner sank a considerable amount of shipping and in 1918 he torpedoed and sank HMHS Rewa, a fully lit and marked hospital ship, fortunately only four people were killed.

What was then proposed was that a new company be formed & that the creditors accept shares in lieu of their debts. Was, in fact, a new company formed or was the existing company restructured? 30 miles NE of Cape Palos, near Cartagena, SE Spain. U-34 was, I read, the 4th most successful German submarine in WW1, sinking 119 ships & damaging 5 more. of Ushant, (an island off the French Brittany coast), on Nov. Engines 'expected to drive the vessel at a high rate of speed'. Lawrence River with Vancouver of Dominion Line & was damaged. 1916), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). long boat, one of only 4 ship's boats, to Colombo, Ceylon, 480 miles away, under the command of Chief Officer Bruckland. And sold in 1921 to Chinese interests (Jensien Transport Co., the managers), & renamed Yuan Ta. Which is strange because the underwriters accepted an offer for the salvage of the Port Douglas & for its cargo at 40% of value. 94.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? The vessel served for many years on the Liverpool to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, route.

The 'new company' was also, I read, named 'Sir James Laing and Sons Limited.'James Marr, [(1854/1932), later (1919) Sir James Marr, obituary etc.], an experienced shipbuilder who was Managing Director of Joseph L. Sister to Westward Ho, built in 1884, also by 'Laing'. Claus Rcker was responsible, in his career, re 88 ships sunk & 3 more damaged. Intended for 'the conveyance of cargo, passengers, and troops between the ports of Java and other ports in Netherlands India'. To be fitted with a bullion room & a large gunpowder magazine. In 1891, 'Koninklijke Paketvaart-Maatschappij' took over the fleet of Netherlands. Lake Ontario's 'clipper bow' prevented critical damage to either ship but the Vancouver was out of service for three months. 31, 1898, the vessel collided with Hindoo, of Wilson Line, in the N. It happened at 47.35N/42.55W in a very heavy snowstorm. 123.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. The boat was driven off course, survived a major storm due to the skill of Bruckland & Tollemache, Umona's 3rd officer, but did safely reach Colombo. The vessel was sold, in 1893, to British India Steam Navigation Co. She must have carried passengers, because it would seem that Kaikoura likely carried them to Hobart, Tasmania. The launch of the vessel was reported in 'Marine Engineer & Naval Architect' of 1913, but the text cannot be seen. Note that Miramar do not refer at all to Neptune or to Furness.

They purchased an old man-of-war, one of those "Leviathans," taken during the last war with the Dutch, and after cutting away all her superfluous timbers, converted her into a very useful floating dock for the repair of vessels.' On May 12, 1818, the John & Philip Laing partnership ended. I read that 3 of his sons worked at the Deptford yard. 19, 1860 (Queen Victoria being its first ship) & later filled in to make way for a fitting out quay (the dock gates apparently can be still seen to-day) and also (likely through 1818) a dry dock known as 'Cornhill' on the north bank of the river next to the Robert Thompson yard. 1890), 2 (DDG Kosmos), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). She lay in a somewhat awkward position for several days, but was eventually floated, without, as we understand, having suffered any damage. On May 15, 1903, the vessel was en route from Colombo, Ceylon, ex Calcutta, India, to Natal & Cape Town, Charles Hedley in command, with 475 Indian men, women & children aboard, 9 (have also read 10) passengers, & a cargo of jute & rice.

John, then 64 years of age, left the partnership & set up a shipbuilding business (1818/c1830) at Southwick with his son James. James, it would seem, was the offspring of a second marriage for Philip? James was Chairman of the River Wear Commission for 32 years & a Director of the Suez Canal Company. 'Cornhill' dry dock continued to exist long after 1818 & is visible in an 1898 Ordnance Survey Map of Southwick Urban District. A most interesting postcard image was provided to the webmaster in Aug. Which image you can see in black & white here and in its original sepia here. Built for 'Hamburg-Calcutta-Linie', of Hamburg, Germany, (A. The vessel must have been later transferred or sold to 'Hamburg Pacific Dampfschiff Linie' (also A. Bad weather was encountered - & the vessel approached the 'One and a Half Degree Channel' thru the Maldives islands late & at night. on May 15, 1903, the ship, 76 miles off her course due to ocean currents, ran aground at Suvadiva Atoll, Maldive Islands. Marr (known as Jimmy), who was in fact the Managing Director of 'Laing's'. Hopefully soon the entire work may grace these pages. Per 1 [Bullard King, Umkuzi (1)], 2 (related ephemera), 3 (Boer War, 70% down, no date), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Per 1 [Bullard King, Umona (1)], 2 (Natal Line of Steamers, ex 3, Whitakers 1894, a 'Google' book), 4 (image), 5 (final voyage, Chapter 12, commencing at page #67), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). It now does, on site page - 160 - & it is interesting reading indeed. 15, 1901, at his residence at Etal Manor, Northumberland, after an illness of a fortnight), & the yard incurred major losses in part due to either or probably both of i) the 1907 conversion contract re HMS Cyclops - that seemed to be a puzzle, but the page that caused me to say that is no longer available, or ii) the building of three 'Lloyd Sabaudo' ships (Re D'Italia, Regina D'Italia & Principe di Piemonte) at a loss. A census in 1901 indicates that Bryan Laing, aged 25, an 'iron shipbuilder', was then living at Ford Hall along with his wife Eleanor, 4 domestic servants & a coachman. 85.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LRMV. 85.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 281.5 ft. The anecdote puts the early shipbuilder history into some perspective, I truly think. It comes however from the 1929 edition of 'Port of Sunderland', published by the River Wear Commissioners. There are a number of WWW references to the ship being at Madras & Calcutta in those years & a reference to its bringing 125 personnel from Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) to South Africa to serve in the Boer War. there really is no meaningful WWW data re the vessel. Engaged on the Cape Town, Durban (Natal), Colombo & Calcutta service. Castriotti (or Castrioti), of Piraeus, Greece, & (3 says 1905) renamed Chariclia. I was interested to read (page #585, here, from that 1852 volume not now available for download) that John & Philip Laing 'were the first to introduce the novelty of a floating dock on our river. I read also that James Laing was the very first Sunderland shipbuilder to build in iron. The image appears here thanks to Tony Frost, who advises me that 'Laings' had in their history two dry docks, one of which (visible in the image) was opened on Jul. 4, 1890, it would appear - owing to an accident, the vessel was suddenly stopped in her course before getting clear of the 'ways'. 6, 1902, Captain Grimm in command, the vessel was wrecked at Punta Guionos, Costa Rica, while en route from Puget Sound, Washington, U. I read however that the vessel was generally on charter to the Natal Emigration Department to carry Indian labourers, at 6 a head, to work in the sugar plantations of Natal & Transvaal. The vessel was sold, in 1898, to 'Paul & Shellshear', also of London. In 1907, it was again sold to 'Domestini, Oeconomou & Co.', also of Piraeus, & in 1912 renamed Leonidas. Anyway, so the story goes:- Philip and John Laing were not very wealthy. Bryan (1875/1941) was one of the many children of Sir James Laing (1823/1901), by his second marriage. Built for 'Bullard King & Company, Limited' (Natal Direct Line), of London. Engaged on the London to Durban, South Africa, service (& surely beyond, to Delagoa Bay, now Maputo Bay, & Beira in Mozambique). Built for 'Bullard King & Company, Limited' (Natal Direct Line), of London. 2012 - re the sale of a 1/64 share of the vessel, at an unstated date in Feb.

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