Thermoluminescence dating archaeology

For example, in a stratum presenting difficulties or ambiguities to absolute dating, paleopalynology can be used as a relative referent by means of the study of the pollens found in the stratum.

Dating is very important in archaeology for constructing models of the past, as it relies on the integrity of dateable objects and samples.

Many disciplines of archaeological science are concerned with dating evidence, but in practice several different dating techniques must be applied in some circumstances, thus dating evidence for much of an archaeological sequence recorded during excavation requires matching information from known absolute or some associated steps, with a careful study of stratigraphic relationships.

Like most dating methods used by secularists, many assumptions are built into their speculations and hypotheses.

All the assumptions mentioned above presume the secularists’ deep-time bias about conditions they haven’t observed.

It is commonly assumed that if the remains or elements to be dated are older than the human species, the disciplines which study them are sciences such geology or paleontology, among some others.

Nevertheless, the range of time within archaeological dating can be enormous compared to the average lifespan of a singular human being.

Dating material drawn from the archaeological record can be made by a direct study of an artifact, or may be deduced by association with materials found in the context the item is drawn from or inferred by its point of discovery in the sequence relative to datable contexts.

Dating is carried out mainly post excavation, but to support good practice, some preliminary dating work called "spot dating" is usually run in tandem with excavation.

It was the case of an 18th-century sloop whose excavation was led in South Carolina (United States) in 1992.

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